3 Strategies To Foster Employee Giving

david t fischer employee giving blogLast week, I wrote a blog that spoke to how 2017 is predicted to be a generous year for charity. There are many reasons for this, but the increased philanthropic spirit on the individual, foundation, and corporation levels are what will truly drive a new year focused on giving back.

For this blog, I wanted to take the corporation’s role in charity and explore in more detail how companies can make more of a difference. First, it is important to clarify that at the heart of a company’s charitable efforts is their employees. Without employees selflessly giving their money, time, and resources, a corporation would not be able to give back as much. The more engaged and involved employees are, the more businesses can do on a local or global level.

There is an increased push to get employees to act on their generosity during the holidays, which is great, but it’s not enough. Charitable actions should be a focus year-round. Here are three ways that you can encourage an increase in employee giving throughout the year:

1. Make it about money, time, and resources.

Not everyone is the same, which means that not everyone will want to give in the same way. Companies fail to recognize this and create an employee giving program that is centered around only one of those three categories, which decreases the amount of employee involvement.

Some individuals may have more room in their budgets to be generous with their money but others may not and, therefore, may want to exercise their goodwill by volunteering their time or giving other resources in order to help those in need.

The methods of giving could also vary depending on generational preferences. Older generations may feel more compelled to stay behind the scenes and write a check for a foundation. Younger generations, specifically millennials, are more about experiences, so they may be more likely to contribute if it involves being more hands-on and active.

2. Put a spotlight on what your employees are doing to make a difference.

If an individual is supporting an event, organization, or foundation that is important to them, they are going to want to be vocal about it. Currently, around 30% of companies encourage their employees to post updates or videos that highlight their philanthropy. As this catches on, I hope more and more companies begin to encourage their employees to do this!

The Walmart Foundation is actually a great representation of this and how it can be successful. They want their employees to be active on social media and share what they are doing to give back. They have even created an account on Twitter that serves as a platform to share these stories.

3. High-impact giving with low cost.

As technology advances, it is making giving back quicker and easier than ever before. The process of giving back should be as efficient, but corporations often struggle with how to do this effectively while also practically administering their campaigns. The solution is to find a balance in managing high-impact activities with low-cost technology. Corporate philanthropy software, such as CyberGrants, may be a great thing for your company to look into. You can pick out an organization to support and employees can choose to donate either their money or time in support of the organization through the software.

You don’t have to be a corporate giant in order to make a difference. Anything that you can do or donate to help support an event, organization, or foundation that is doing good on a local or global level will help make an impact. Use these tactics in your company to get your employees more involved in the new year! Not only will you be supporting those in need, but it will also help to foster a healthier, more close-knit community within your workplace.

This post was originally published on David T. Fischer’s website.

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